Stage Sets

The Hudson School in Hoboken, where I attended much of middle and high school had an active student theater scene. For various productions, classmates and staff asked me to design, execute, and paint the stage set to reflect different themes and environments. Each set is divided into two, 8 by 16 foot plywood panels. I begun by creating scaled drawings shown below. I then translated these drawings onto the full stage set wall, first with a chalk underdrawing and then above with acrylic paint. Sometimes, for lower budget or time-sensitive productions, the mere chalk sketch was sufficient.

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Wizard of Oz (2013)

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Death Sketch (2012)

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.Pirates of PenzancePirates of Penzance (2015)

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Uncle Philips Coat

Uncle Phillips Coat (2014)

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stage set finalParadise (2014)

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Wizard of Oz Set

Wizard of Oz (2013)

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Death Set Final

Death (2012)

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The Nightmare Before ChistmasNightmare Before Christmas (2011)

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The Nightmare before ChristmasNightmare Before Christmas (2011)

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Crazy for You SetCrazy for You (2010)

Panoramic New York

When I gaze across the Hudson from New Jersey, the soaring towers, glassy behemoths, and dark canyons of New York City instill deep awe in me. The broad expanse of the city juts out of the water with crenelated and jagged skyscrapers as if proclaiming: “I am here to stay. Come sun, wind, or water, I will remain. I will grow.”

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Madison Square

Madison Square Park

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George Washington BridgeGeorge Washington Bridge from Riverside State Park

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George Washington Bridge PanoramicGeorge Washington Bridge from Riverside State Park

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 New York CityManhattan from Hoboken, NJ

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IMG_6256Misty Manhattan Morning

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New York HarborManhattan from Brooklyn Heights

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Saint John the Divine

St. John the Divine 12

 

The Cathedral of Saint John the Divine soars above the low-slung tenements and boxy towers that edge up against it on all sides.

Unfinished it survives; funds have long since dried up in our era of secularism and consumerism. Yet powerful it stands; solid stone will outlive concrete and glass any day.

Five hundred years from now, the urban environment may change. Glass behemoths may rise and fall and condo homes may come and go, but this monument to past ages will stand, solid as ever.

Its soaring jagged silhouette seems to proclaim against the soot that darkens its façade and the urban din that drowns out the sanctity of silence: Come weather, wind, or rain, I will remain.

saint-john-the-divine

 

 

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